It seems I must write

no more avoiding the truth

Chaplaincy

I’m going to do a 3-month intensive hospital chaplaincy training program this summer… really excited. Watch this page for what I discover along the way. Some things so far:

 

– Two friends just sent me the same link in light of what I’ll be doing this summer– and I thought it was a good read:

http://religion.blogs.cnn.com/2012/01/28/my-faith-what-people-talk-about-before-they-die/

 

– Somehow the title of “chaplain” opens up a different conversation than that of “pastor” or “minister”.   People go, “a chaplain? What’s that?” Different people would be willing to talk for longer — or about different topics. I first discovered this at Harvard, where I worked for a few years with the Harvard Chaplains… and as one of the campus ministers with a parachurch organization.  All this has gotten me interested in the different places where chaplains work — the military, in hospitals, with police departments.

– In the fall, as part of my training to do police chaplaincy work, I did a ‘ride-along’ with a female police officer accompanied by a K-9… four hours in a car with a cop taught me a lot about the very private world of law enforcement, the daily uncertainty of what you’d find covering your beat, the sense that they’re not well-paid for what they do each day but for what could happen one day — and the funny things people will say to a cop they trust! Hope to write more later about this…

 

5 thoughts on “Chaplaincy

  1. I can’t seem to find the date for this post so I don’t know if you mean this summer or if this has already happened… but this sounds really cool!!!

  2. I’ll be doing the chaplaincy internship THIS summer!! (if they’re not dated, it’s probably current :D)

  3. hey tth,
    i was actually thinking about whether you might have a chance to get involved with the criminal justice system out in CA! what does the police chaplaincy involve?

    these are two articles on my mind lately, weighing heavily on my heart. the story about the boy in the second article just kills me. what is God’s calling on us as Christians to bear witness to what others have made invisible?

    http://www.newyorker.com/arts/critics/atlarge/2012/01/30/120130crat_atlarge_gopnik

    http://www.nplusonemag.com/raise-the-crime-rate

    • Haven’t read these articles yet, but I will!

      Police Chaplaincy won’t begin for a while… but Citizens’ Police Academy will start for me next week as a “prerequisite”! Will have to post more as I learn more!

      • JUST reading the New Yorker article about imprisonment… which is timely, because I’m visiting our county jail tomorrow. I wonder what I’ll think of it, having read this.

        At this point — thinking mostly of what I heard last week at CPA class: the dominant thought around the police department is that the people who are in county jail are there for a reason — and often many good reasons. There’s a lot of procedure + a ton of rules the police abide by in order to a) pull a person over, b) detain him/her, c) make an arrest, d) make an arrest that warrants any type of imprisonment – even temporary … e) send someone to prison for a longer period of time… and so forth.

        But then I read this quote from that article: “The trouble with the Bill of Rights, he argues, is that it emphasizes process and procedure rather than principles.”…And that gives me pause…

        Read more http://www.newyorker.com/arts/critics/atlarge/2012/01/30/120130crat_atlarge_gopnik#ixzz1t7irlrfq

        I like that the author looks into the inexplicability of certain trends…
        “Crime ends as a result of “cyclical forces operating on situational and contingent things rather than from finding deeply motivated essential linkages.”

        Read more http://www.newyorker.com/arts/critics/atlarge/2012/01/30/120130crat_atlarge_gopnik#ixzz1t7mKpiAO

        “Which leads, further, to one piece of radical common sense: since prison plays at best a small role in stopping even violent crime, very few people, rich or poor, should be in prison for a nonviolent crime. Neither the streets nor the society is made safer by having marijuana users or peddlers locked up, let alone with the horrific sentences now dispensed so easily.”

        Read more http://www.newyorker.com/arts/critics/atlarge/2012/01/30/120130crat_atlarge_gopnik#ixzz1t7muzxRm

        To this, I only have to say: the officer pulled over a guy today for having an illegal horn on his car — found a big thing of marijuana, but because we’re in California… let him go…

        THANKS, Kristin — for passing on such a stirring article that changes the perspective a bit for me…No conclusive thoughts just yet.

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